D&T Product Design & Engineering

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A wide range of topics involving resistant materials is covered throughout the curriculum, including learning about the different types of materials and their uses; designing and creating with CAD and lasers, milling machines. Learn more about the curriculum in detail and how homework is set below:

Year 7

Term 1

Fun Fob

Design Skills – This project focuses on the student’s ability to present information in a number of forms including sequencing for production planning. The importance of presenting information on packaging is covered using both test and images. Creative thinking is also used in the process of designing, and packaging their own design of a key fob. Computer Aided Design is integral to this project.

Practical Skills – Students work with plastics using both traditional hand based manufacturing methods and Computer Aided Systems.

Homework: Students will carry out research at home using the Internet and other secondary sources to complete a product analysis of an existing products.
How to help:

www.technologystudent.com

Term 2

Steady Hand Game

Design Skills – The Design Skills focused on in this project are research skills and creative thinking. Students design a theme for their game and research other games and what themes of shapes their game might take.
Practical Skills – Students learn to work with softwoods and metal and to use traditional manufacturing skills with a range of hand-tools. Basic electronics skills are also introduced in this activity.

Homework: Students will carry out research at home using the Internet and other secondary sources to complete a product analysis of an existing products.
How to help:

www.technologystudent.com

Term 3

Structures

Design Skills – The Skills focused on in this project are team work, presenting information and evaluation of their own performance. Students work in a team taking on different responsibilities and roles. They are assessed on their evaluative presentation that needs to give all the key information about the process they have been through and they are also assessed on the quality of the evaluation of their work.

Practical Skills – The students use the range of making skills developed over the course of Year 7 to build a small structure which has to be tested with weights. The structure with the heighest strength to weight ratio is the winner – so the teams need to have high levels of accuracy to reduce the weight of the materials used.

Homework: Students will carry out research at home using the Internet and other secondary sources to complete a product analysis of an existing products.
How to help:

www.technologystudent.com

Year 8

Term 1

Gadget Stand

Design Skills – The students learn how to manipulate and modify an existing graphic using CAD. They use this to produce a stand for a phone or tablet,  in acrylic using the laser cutter.

Practical Skills – The students learn various techniques used to join wood, metal and plastic in the workshop. Learn how to accurately mark out, cut, join and finish in different materials.

Homework: Students will carry out an evaluation of their gadget stands, bringing in feedback and evidence of testing with their families.
How to help:

www.technologystudent.com

Term 2

Gumball Machine (new project)

Design Skills – Using questionnaires and product analysis to help design development. Designing to a specification.

Practical Skills –  In the half of this project, students will learn about larger scale production. The class will adopt roles in a simulated factory to work as a team and create a batch produced sweet dispenser. The students then use their design and making skills to adapt this batch produced design to produce a customised and fun design using a wide variety of the materials, processes and skills obtained during the previous project.

Mechanisms and Moments – The students learn about movement and mechanisms, so that they can understand how movement can be used to do work (drop sweets).

Homework: Students will carry out research at home using the Internet and other secondary sources to complete a product analysis of an existing products.
How to help:

www.technologystudent.com/mechanisms

Term 3

Frog Moisture Tester

Practical Skills –  Developing knowledge of electronic systems through working with electronic components to build input/process/output circuits. Using vacuum forming techniques to produce packaging for electronic circuits. Assembling electronic products and fault finding.

Homework: Students will carry out research at home using the Internet and other secondary sources to complete a product analysis of an existing products.
How to help:

www.technologystudent.com/electronics

Year 9

Term 1

Jewellery & Hardwood Box

Students will be working in teak to produce a high quality miniature box which could be used to store jewellery or other small items. This extends the skills that they have already gained working in softwood in Years 7 and 8 by using more challenging wood joints and achieving a near perfect polished finish. In addition to this students will design an engraved lid using 2D CAD (computer aided design).

Homework: Resistant Materials- Students to extend their learning in the jewellery box task by designing an original black and white image for the lid of their box and bringing it to school for scanning and engraving. Students will extend their learning through a subject-specific literacy task and with a numeracy based drawing exercise.
How to help:

www.technologystudent.com/joints

www.howstuffworks.com

 

Term 2

Block Clock

Design Skills – Using questionnaires and product analysis to help design development. Designing to a specification.

Practical Skills –  The students learn to model and then make a block clock using a wide variety of the materials, processes and skills obtained during the previous project. The students produce a sophisticated and challenging clock which has a high quality finish

Homework: Students will carry out research at home using the Internet and other secondary sources to complete a product analysis of an existing products.
How to help:

www.technologystudent.com/design_process

www.howstuffworks.com

 

Term 3

T – Shirt Printing

Design Skills – The students learn how to create or modify and manipulate exiting graphics on the computer to produce a screen printing design.

Practical Skills –  The students will use the skills they have learned on the KS3 course to produce a one-off custom printed t-shirt. They also design and print a label for their new clothing brand.

Homework: Students will carry out research at home using the Internet and other secondary sources to complete a product analysis of an existing clothing products.
How to help:

www.technologystudent.com/screenprinting

www.howstuffworks.com

Year 10

WJEC Engineering Level 1 / 2 Award

Engineering – Term 1

The qualification is based around the world of engineering and aims to introduce students to the various strands available within the field. The qualification offers students the chance to develop knowledge, skills and understanding through tasks set in realistic work-related contexts.

Study Areas: 

Manufacturing: The students will make a metal screwdriver in a personalised presentation box. They will be in the workshops turning on the centre lathes, shaping and finishing ferrous and non-ferrous metals, knurling, drilling & thread cutting.

Knowledge and understanding: Safety in the workshop. Heat treatment of carbon steels including annealing. Permanent / non permanent fastenings. Technical language & terminology. Ferrous, non ferrous metal & alloys. Joining metals using mechanical fastenings, and heat – gas and electric welding, brazing, soft soldering.

Engineering Mathematics  – volumes /areas / quantity calculations / costings.

Designing Skills: Interpreting 3rd angle orthographic drawings, drawing to British Standards, dimensioning, using 2D CAD.

Homework:

Studying engineering materials, manufacturing, industrial processes and product case studies. Revision required for small class tests and the end-of-topic metals test.

How to help:

www.technologystudent.com/materials

www.technologystudent.com/equipment

GCSE Bitsize

www.wjec.co.uk/engineering

Engineering – Term 2

Unit 1 (9791): Engineering Design – 30 Guided Learning Hours

The purpose of this unit is: for learners to analyse engineered products in order to propose design solutions to meet requirements.

What makes an MP3 player work? How can you make a games controller for young children? Can you make a basketball post that fits into a backpack? How does a ‘wind-up’
radio work? Could you power a television the same way?

Manufacturers, sales teams, technical teams will often ask engineers to find answers to these types of questions. Design consultancies or research and development teams will aim
to design products that work, but these products also have to meet different needs. This could be to make the product portable or smaller or cheaper. Whether making something
new or adapting an existing product, engineers follow a design process.

In this unit, you will learn about that design process. You will learn how to analyse a product so you can see what features make it work and how it meets certain requirements. You will
learn how to take ideas from different products in order to produce a design specification for a product.

This assessed unit follows the following format:

AC1.1 – Identify features that contribute to the primary function of engineered products.

Features:

  • Of component parts
  • Electrical components
  • Mechanical components
  • Properties of component materials

AC1.2 – Identify features of engineered products that meet requirements of a brief.

Requirements:

  • Aesthetic
  • Environment (where used)
  • User/customer/client
  • Cost
  • Safety
  • Ergonomics
  • Size
  • Limits
  • Sustainability

AC1.3 – Describe how engineered products function.

Function:

  • How components interrelate

AC2.1 – Draw engineering design solutions (using British Standards).

Draw:

  • 3rd angle orthographic projection & Isometric
  • Dimensions and associated symbols
  • Diameter, circumference, radius, height, depth, width
  • Conventions  ie Title block, Dimension lines, Extension lines, Centre lines, Metric units of measurement, Hidden detail, Scale

AC2.2 – Communicate design ideas.

Communicate:

  • Convey meaning
  • Using appropriate language
  • Logical structure
  • Presentation of information
  • Clarity of language and presentation
  • Use of appropriate terminology
  • Audiences (engineers, non-engineers)
  • Use of visual support, e.g. mock-ups, CAD

AC3.1 – Develop creative ideas for engineered products.

Creative ideas:

  • Identify features of other engineered products
  • Generate ideas
  • Explore implementation of ideas

AC3.2 – Evaluate options for design solutions.

Evaluate:

  • Constraints
  • Design requirements
  • Fit for purpose
  • Best fit
  • Operating performance
  • Reliability

Evaluation techniques:

  • Total Design Model
  • SWOT analysis
  • Advantages and disadvantages

AC3.3 – Produce design specifications.

Design specifications:

  • Clear communication
  • Demands/wishes
  • Using prepared templates
  • Using set criteria

Note that the students will not be required to make this product – but they will need to model it either physically or in a 3D CAD package.

Homework:

Studying engineering materials, manufacturing, industrial processes and product case studies. Disassembling and investigating existing manufactured products.

How to help:

www.technologystudent.com/materials

www.technologystudent.com/equipment

GCSE Bitsize

www.wjec.co.uk/engineering

 

Engineering – Term 3

Unit 3 (9793): Solving Engineering Problems  – 30 Guided Learning Hours

This term the students will focus on preparing for the 90 minute examination held in May/June:

  • Total of 60 marks, three short or extended answer questions.
  • Each question will have an applied problem solving scenario, that address at least two of mechanical, electronic and structural engineering problems.
  • At least 5 marks will be awarded for demonstration of mathematical skills. This could include interpretation, calculation or use of mathematical terminology.
  • At least 10 marks will be awarded for demonstrating drawing skills.
  • Learners are allowed one re-sit opportunity. The highest grade will contribute towards the overall grade for the qualification.

The purpose of this unit is: for learners to use their knowledge and understanding of engineering processes and material properties to solve problems.

What materials can be used to go into space? Are some vacuum cleaners really innovative? How important was the development of the jet engine? Do robots make better engineers than people? How do I install a gate? How can engineers help communities after an earthquake? How do engineers use computers and technology? How do I tell steel from aluminium? Does it matter?

Engineers can have a major impact on industry and society. The achievements they have made have improved the quality of our everyday life, from the buildings we live and work in to the transport we use to get around and how we enjoy our leisure time. Engineers are able to find solutions to problems, whether it is adapting or combining materials used to produce a product to make it withstand severe weather conditions or fixing materials in a different way to make something more portable. Problem solving is critical to working in engineering.

In this unit you will learn about how engineers in the past have found solutions to problems and how other engineers use their ideas to solve problems today. You will learn about materials, processes and maths that engineers use and how they are used to solve problems. In solving problems, you will learn to follow a process and develop drawing skills to communicate your solutions.

In the examination, students are expected to demonstrate their understanding of the following aspects of engineering;

AC1.1 describe engineering developments

Developments:

  • Structural Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Electronic Engineering.
  • Engineers involved in the UK & International
  • Key outputs
  • Applications
  • Technologies
  • Materials

AC1.2 explain effects of engineering achievements

Effects:

  • In the home
  • In industry
  • In society

AC1.3 explain how environmental issues affect engineering applications

Environmental issues:

  • Use, Disposal & Recycling
  • Materials development
  • Engineering processes
  • Costs
  • Transportation
  • Sustainability

Applications:

  • Engineering processes
  • Engineering products

AC2.1 describe properties required of materials for engineering products engineering products

  • Structural, e.g. buildings, bridges
  • Mechanical, e.g. gearbox, crane, bicycle
  • Electronic, e.g. mobile phone, communications, alarm

Properties:

  • Tensile strength
  • Hardness
  • Toughness
  • Malleability
  • Ductility
  • Conductivity
  • Corrosive resistance
  • Environmental degradation
  • Elasticity

AC2.2 explain how materials are tested for properties

Tests:

  • Destructive tests
  • Non-destructive tests
  • Properties: As in AC2.1

AC2.3 select materials for a purpose

Materials:

  • Ferrous & Non-ferrous Metals
  • Thermoplastics & Thermo-setting plastics
  • Smart Materials & Composites

AC3.1 describe engineering processes

Processes:

  • Marking out
  • Cutting & Drilling
  • Joining – Permanent & Temporary fixings
  • Preparing & Finishing
  • Filing & Shaping
  • Turning
  • Brazing & Soldering

AC3.2 describe applications of engineering processes

Applications:

  • For material removal
  • For shaping and manipulation
  • For joining and assembly
  • For heat and chemical treatment

AC4.1 use mathematical techniques for solving engineering problems

Mathematical techniques:

  • Use of formulae – Ohms law & Efficiency
  • Areas and volumes of geometric shapes
  • Measuring, Calculation, Estimation & Mean
  • Units of measurement – Metric, metres, millimetres, pounds & pence

AC4.2 convert between isometric sketches and 3rd angle orthographic projections

Convert:

  • Section views, Construction lines, Centre lines, Hidden detail & Standard conventions

AC4.3 analyse situations for engineering problems

Analyse:

  • Filter information
  • Synthesise information
  • Identify salient points
  • Identify requirements

AC4.4 propose solutions in response to engineering problems

Propose solutions:

  • Communication
  • Logical structure
Homework: Students need to study their notes and text books, as well as completing practice questions.
How to help:

www.technologystudent.com Joints

www.technologystudent.com Equip

GCSE Bitesize

 

 

Year 11

Engineering – Term 1

Unit 2 (9792): Producing Engineering Products  – 60 Guided Learning Hours

The students will mostly be making in this Conrolled Assessment unit. This term the students will focus on completing the second assessed unit, which is internally assessed and externally moderated. The actual work takes place in school under controlled conditions, over approximately 10 lessons. The student will be designing a product, following guidance from the examination board.

The purpose of this unit is: for learners to use skills developed to produce an engineered product.

What are vernier callipers? How do I know how to make something? How do I use a centre lathe? Can you use computers in engineering? Can I use a saw to cut metal? How important is it to get measurements right?

It doesn’t matter whether making parts for space travel or toys, for bridges or power generation, using the right tools and equipment in a safe way is critical to production engineering. Production engineers, skilled machinists and maintenance engineers will use a range of engineering processes, equipment and tools to make engineered products. They will work from engineering information, whether provided by design consultants, quality managers or colleagues, or they will produce their own information as they try out different ways of engineering a product.

Through this unit, you will learn to interpret different types of engineering information in order to plan how to make engineered products. You will develop the skills needed to work safely
with a range of engineering processes, equipment and tools. With these skills, you will learn to make a range of engineered processes that are fit for purpose.

AC1.1 interpret engineering drawings

Interpret:

  • Symbols
  • Conventions
  • Information
  • Calculations

Sources:

  • Sketches
  • Drawings
  • Design specifications

AC1.2 interpret engineering information

Engineering information:

  • Data charts 
  • Data sheets
  • Job sheets
  • Specifications
  • Tolerances

AC2.1 identify resources required

Resources:

  • Materials
  • Equipment
  • Tools
  • Time

AC2.2 sequence required activities

Sequence:

  • Prioritise activities
  • Which are needed before something else can be done
  • Within designated parameters
  • Consideration of resources available
  • Contingencies

AC3.1 use tools in production of engineering products

Tools:

  • Hand tools
  • Lathe tools
  • Turning tools
  • Portable power tools

Health and safety:

  • Awareness and application of Health and Safety practices

AC3.2 use equipment in production of engineering products

Equipment:

  • Centre lathes
  • Drilling machines
  • Milling machines
  • Portable power tool equipment
  • Multimeters
  • UV PCB light box
  • PCB tank

Health and safety:

  • Awareness and application of Health and Safety practices

AC4.1 use engineering processes in production of engineered products

Materials:

  • Metals
  • Non-metals, e.g. wood, plastics

Engineering processes:

  • Marking out
  • Cutting
  • Finishing
  • Preparing
  • Shaping
  • Drilling
  • Turning
  • Brazing
  • Joining
  • Filing
  • Soldering

Health and safety:

  • Awareness and application of Health and Safety practices

AC4.2 evaluate quality of engineered products

Evaluate:

  • Inspection techniques
  • Against success criteria
  • Against engineering information
Homework:
How to help:

Please encourage positively the need to keep to deadlines and ask your child to show you their designs. They will be able to do theory research using the internet.

www.technologystudent.com

 

Engineering – Term 2

Continuation and finishing off Unit 2 (please see above)
Homework: Students will be given specific tasks to do at home, if & when required. They will also continue to get past paper practice questions.

How to help: Please encourage positively the need to keep to deadlines and ask your child to show you their designs. They will be able to do theory research using the internet

 

Engineering – Term 3

Students who have successfully passed the examination in Year 10 will have now completed this course. For students resitting their exam – please see the information for Term 3 in Year 10.

Homework: See Term 3 in Year 10.
How to help: See Term 3 in Year 10.